Brimpton History: Byeways

Brimpton History: Byeways

The bungalow known as Byeways appears to date to the early 1930s or 40s, when it was built by the owners of East View (now Eastbank) in what was their garden. The house was originally built to house the Brimpton Post Office (one of at least 4 present buildings that has housed this at one time or another!) – you can still see some of the features on the modern building, if you look closely. The old shed you can…

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Brimpton History: East View / Eastbank

Brimpton History: East View / Eastbank

Not a lot is known about the house known as East View (now Eastbank), short of one notable previous owner – Mrs Norman, who also owned what is now the Old Post Office, in the 1930s/40s. Mrs Norman ran the post office at the time, and during her ownership of East View she built a bungalow in its garden to house the Brimpton Post Office – the building now known as Byeways. Before this, and based solely one what we…

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Brimpton News: Made in Brimpton

Brimpton News: Made in Brimpton

A massive thank you to everyone who came along to our ‘arts and crafts’ show this weekend, Made in Brimpton. Having originally been planned for 2021 (but delayed by a year due to Covid) this show has been well over a year in the planning, but it seemed to go off without a hitch. If you came along to view the artwork, thank you! The organisers behind the scenes put a huge amount of work into getting everything to run…

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Brimpton History: Close Cottage

Brimpton History: Close Cottage

Like a number of other old buildings in the village (including the Old Post Office), Close Cottage was once the home to Brimpton’s Postal Service. In fact, it was the very first – home to the Penny Post from 1847, run by villager Stephen Stair (a local shoemaker). According to the ‘Brimpton Story’, letters arrived from Newbury at 9am and were dispatched around the area at 4pm. The Post Office continued to operate from Close Cottage for nearly 70 years…

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Brimpton History: The Old Post Office

Brimpton History: The Old Post Office

Seemingly one of the most well-documented buildings in the village (see below for several examples), the building known now as ‘The Old Post Office’ was – as the name suggests – one of many buildings in the village that once served as the Post Office. In this case, from around the 1930s – though it also served as a village shop (called ‘The Old Post Office Stores’) in the 1960s and beyond. Before serving as the Post Office / Village…

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Brimpton History: The Pineapple Inn

Brimpton History: The Pineapple Inn

Situated on the southern boundary of Brimpton Common, The Pineapple Inn was another of the village’s public houses for a time. Dating as far back as the seventeenth century (though possibly earlier) it remains today very much as it always has – though it is no longer in use as a pub. The name supposedly refers to the fruit of the pine tree – aka the pine cone (rather than the more tropical version), of which there are many in…

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Brimpton History: The Three Horseshoes

Brimpton History: The Three Horseshoes

Situated in the middle of the village, the Three Horseshoes was Brimpton’s longest-serving public house, before it closed its doors in the year 2021. The present building (currently in the process of being turned into a private dwelling) was built in 1869, and replaced ‘The Horse Shoes’ pub which was sat near St Peter’s Church. The pub was named after the village farrier, who used to shoe horses in a building next to the pub. The building was first owned…

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Brimpton History: Blacknest Lodge

Brimpton History: Blacknest Lodge

Situated in Brimpton Common, Blacknest Lodge dates back to 1903, though there have been buildings on the site for a lot longer – John Arundell purchased much of the land in Brimpton Common back in 1839 and this included the house at Blacknest. Supposedly the cellar underneath the lodge dates back to Georgian times, and the occupants at the time (the Goddards) had lived there from the mid 1700s. The Lodge was built by a Mr P Dollar, whose initial…

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Brimpton History: Brimpton Lodge

Brimpton History: Brimpton Lodge

According to the writers of the ‘Brimpton Story’ book, the house known as ‘Brimpton Lodge’ (offset from Wasing Lane, on the way out of the village) is at least two hundred years old, but possibly a lot older. The oldest section of the building was originally a pair of cottages, which were merged and expanded by subsequent owners – adding on doors, windows, staircases and a number of roof alterations. Oddly, one particular ‘upgrade’ saw the addition of a large…

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Brimpton History: Baptist Church & School Room

Brimpton History: Baptist Church & School Room

The following is an extract from “A Century of Witness”, a 1944 book by Mr Leslie Wyeth (a Baptist Minister who often preached in Brimpton’s Baptist Chapel) goes into great detail about the origins of the church and school room. The extract was transcribed in the village book, ‘The Brimpton Story’ in 1999. “In 1831 a corn merchant called Jabez Vines took a lease of Brimpton Mill. He was a member of the Baptist Church in Reading and Mr Wyeth…

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